Services We Offer

Click on a title to learn more about the procedure.

Electromyography (EMG)

Electroencephalogram (EEG)

Deep Brain Stimulation Service (DBS)

Botox Injections

Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS)

BacIolen Pump

Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap)


Electromyography (EMG)

Electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies (NCS) are tests that measure muscle and nerve function. In most cases, both tests are performed. NCS is most often done first. During NCS, mild electrical currents are applied to the skin on some parts of your body. This is done to see how quickly impulses travel between nerves. EMG assesses muscle function. To do this, a fine needle is placed under your skin into the muscles being tested. The needle allows the electrical activity in your muscles to be measured. During each test, wavy lines (waveforms) appear on a screen or on paper. These lines show how well your nerves and muscles work. These waveforms help to determine your test results.


Electroencephalogram (EEG)

An EEG records the electrical activity of the brain. Highly sensitive monitoring equipment records the activity through electrodes that are places at measured intervals on a patient’s scalp. For the patient, the test is not painful. The head is measured and the electrodes are placed on the scalp with a paste-like substance. The test itself usually takes about 60-90 minutes, and the principal role of the patient is simply to remain still, relaxed and comfortable. During the test, the patient may be asked to take repeated deep breaths (hyperventilate) and may be shown a strobe light that flashes at different speeds. Both activities can help reveal different brain patterns that are useful for diagnosis. Sometimes, physicians will ask for a sleep deprived EEG. This type of testing is helpful for evaluation of epileptiform discharges, which are seen well during sleep. For sleep tests, the patient may be asked to stay awake most or part of the night prior to the EEG appointment. EEGs assist physicians in the diagnosis of a variety of neurological problems, from seizure disorders, strokes to degenerative brain diseases. Patient will be asked to shampoo the head prior to the testing for better application of the electrodes.

Video Electroencephalogram: At the time of an EEG, video camera will record patient’s activities. It is especially useful for recording seizures. Simultaneous EEG helps physicians to determine the type, location and duration of the seizures.

24-Hour Ambulatory EEG: The ambulatory EEG records brain activity for 48-72 hours on a small tape recorder that is worn around the waist. Electrodes are applied to the scalp with a gluelike substance, and the patient is sent home with a diary to record activities and any symptoms during the 24 hours.


Deep Brain Stimulation Service (DBS)

Carolina Neurology Center offers Deep Brain Stimulation services in collaboration with Neurosurgery colleagues at Baptist Medical Center and Duke University Medical Center. Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy uses electrical stimulation to safely and effectively treat some of the most disabling motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. As a result, many patients achieve greater control over their body movements and get a second chance at life. Now approved for advanced Parkinson’s disease, Activa Parkinson’s Control Therapy is a safe and effective adjunctive treatment option for many Parkinson’s patients. Activa Therapy controls rigidity, bradykinesia/akinesia and/or tremors while reducing the duration of dyskinesia related to parkinsonian medication.


Botox Injections

Botox Injection for Dystonia, blephrospam, hemifacial spasms, and headaches are offered at our facility.


Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS)

VNS is an adjunctive treatment for certain types of intractable epilepsy and major depression. VNS uses an implanted stimulator that sends electric impulses to the left vagus nerve in the neck via a lead wire implanted under the skin. In 1997, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of VNS as an adjunctive therapy for partial-onset epilepsy. Implantation of the VNS is done by the Neurosurgeons/ENT surgeons.


BacIolen Pump

ITB Therapy (the baclofen pump) is a precise, targeted treatment proven to reduce severe spasticity caused by spinal cord injury or spinal cord disease, such as Multiple Sclerosis. Medtronic SynchroMed® pump is a programmable, battery-powered medical device that stores and delivers a prescription medication called Lioresal Intrathecal (baclofen injection). It is surgically placed in the abdomen. A thin, flexible silicone tube called a catheter is inserted near the spine and connected to the pump.


Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap)

A lumbar puncture (LP) is the insertion of a needle into the fluid within the spinal canal. It is termed a “lumbar puncture” because the needle goes into the lumbar portion (the “small”) of the back. Other names for a lumbar puncture include spinal tap, spinal puncture or thecal puncture. A LP is most commonly performed to diagnose a disease, namely to obtain a sample of the fluid in the spinal canal (the cerebrospinal fluid) for examination .